google-site-verification=FtIyLTUis79a3PnuubAVcfEEG9yiJNj_QXWndgVt21s
top of page

How to use Neem Oil for Dogs

Updated: Jan 25



Neem oil which is native to India. is extracted from the seed kernels and bark of the neem tree by crushing the oil out. It’s used as a natural insecticide, pesticide, skin treatment.

Dog parents often chose it as an alternative to medications that repel fleas and ticks, as it’s not toxic for dogs, and the nasty taste makes dogs less likely to lick it off of their fur. It has many beneficial properties that boost dogs’ overall health, and it’s very potent.

Neem oil can fight off infections and microbes that cause itching with its antibacterial, antiviral, and antimicrobial properties. . Pure neem oil is very potent, and it should be diluted before being used to treat dogs.



One of the most common uses of neem oil for dogs is as a pesticide and insect repellent. It’s effective against mosquitoes, mites, internal parasites, fleas, and many kinds of ticks. Although, it does not protect against brown dog ticks or tapeworms.

Many flea and tick medicines that you’d pick up from a veterinarian contain chemicals and drugs that are potentially harmful for dogs, especially if dogs ingest the medication by licking it off of their fur. Neem oil is not toxic, and it has a bitter, nasty taste and smell that tends to prevent dogs from trying to lick it off.

Neem oil can also be applied to relieve itchiness due to food allergies, insect bites, some kinds of mange, dry spots, and chaffing. Dog parents report that alopecia due to severe itching generally clears up within a week. Additionally, when neem oil is applied regularly, it is absorbed into the bloodstream through the skin and gives dogs protection from further infections or infestations for some time.

It has been shown to purify the blood, support the liver, and improve immune system health. Some report that it also improves the health of dogs’ teeth.

Consult your veterinarian before using neem oil for your dog. Some dogs may be sensitive or allergic to it, and if you see the signs of an allergic reaction in your dog, including sneezing, coughing, hives, swelling, difficulty breathing, or other symptoms, you should stop using neem oil right away.

Some dog parents dilute neem oil with grape seed or olive oil and dab it directly to the places where parasites are most likely to appear, including the head, ears, tail, shoulders, and flanks. This can be done every two or three days as a preventative measure to ward off infections and infestations.

The diluted mixture may also be applied to areas of irritation, including sunburns or hot spots, for some immediate relief.

Dilute 1 part neem oil to 10 parts grape seed or olive oil. If the condition doesn’t clear up, you can increase the amount of neem oil in the mixture. Mix 1 part of neem oil with 2 parts of shampoo. Mix a few minutes before use, as shampoo will make the oil inactive. Massage it into the dog’s skin and let it sit for at least 5 to 10 minutes before rinsing.

A neem oil spray can be made with 1 part neem oil to 10 parts warm water. Mix in mild, dog-safe detergent or essential oils to mask the smell.

The mixture should only be made for same-day use, as the oil will become less potent with time. It should be sprayed all over the dog’s body in generous amounts.

Do not apply to open wounds, cuts, or sores, or your dog’s eyes, nose or mouth.

Neem oil washes off furniture easily. There are different qualities of neem oil. Odorless neem oil does not repel insects. To purchase neem oil for your dog click here.

* Affiliate




10 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page